Release Date
07 Apr 14
Whilst Field Music are perhaps the best example of modern flavoured prog that we've got, School of Language is very much a pop project. But its a pop record that sounds sparse, cold and industrialised, very much a product of its conception and birth (the North East of England, in particular, Filed Music's own studio on the banks of the Wear where it was recorded). If you don't already know, School of Language is the side-project of David Brewis and its been six years since he last used this moniker as a mouthpiece (if you exclude a few rare outings like this one).
Artist
Release Date
05 Aug 13
Barbarossa is James Mathé from London. You may remember him from when he was signed to Fence Records and released the well received debut album Chemical Campfires, which sounded, for want of a better comparison, a bit "Fence Collectivey". His new music is ambitiously electro and he's jumped ship to Memphis Industries, home of kindred spirits Dutch Uncles and Field Music. Things aren't quite as frantic as these aforementioned label mates though, the new record Bloodlines plays out at a consistently docile pace with a fittingly downbeat moodiness hanging over the entire thing.
Release Date
12 Nov 12
Having left the sixties pop inspired indie of her first two albums behind on “Love Is Not Pop” in favour of a more electronic sound, for her fifth album, Sarah Assbring has decided to look back to a more recent era and make a record that she has talked of as an homage to the music she loved from the nineties. While the idea of another addition to the growing clutch of nineties revival records may chill the bones of anybody for whom the word “Britpop” causes the onset of a cold sweat, fortunately, Assbring’s taste is far better than that.
Artist
Release Date
01 Oct 12
The covers album –the last refuge of artists currently on a crash course towards the metaphorical creative brick wall or a chance to pay tribute to those that they admire? History has given us both good, bad and indifferent examples of these, ranging from the celebrated 1973 pairing of David Bowie’s “Pin Ups” and Bryan Ferry’s “These Foolish Things” to Duran Duran’s unfairly maligned “Thank You” from 1995 (yes, I do realise that I’m in a such a tiny minority that you’d need to employ the services of a jeweller’s eye piece to see it).