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A review of...

The Wink by Tim Presley

Label:
Date: 
September 16, 2016
Writer: 
Adam Millard
8.0

The gist

Tim Presley goes solo, kind of

The music

The first thing i noticed about The Wink is that it would appear to have Cate le Bon (with her producer hat on) written all over it. Or maybe Cate le Bon has got Tim Presley written all over her? Maybe this is Tim Presley's sound? Cate le Bon didn't always make albums that sounded like this. Maybe we'll just say that these two have a huge influence over one-another, so much so that this record could sit alongside Cate le Bon's Crab Day and Drinks' Hermits On Holiday as being output from the same collective, subtly different but with defining characteristics, a classic trilogy of sorts. This record is probably the most stripped down of the three, where silences are welcomed and electric guitars are often played cleanly with little to know fanfare. It can also be playful, like on "Goldfish Wheelchair" with its random blasts of pumping organ, or on "The Wink" with its cool Talking Heads rhythm and piano interludes which are pure Hunky Dory. However, as with any record that Presley has been involved with, it also has it's "out-there" moments such as the clanging outro to "ER" (which features a mutilated piano line which could be seen as the Hyde to "The Wink"'s Jekyll), or the ambient noodling on the rather unrepresentative opening track "O Guardian A".

At once discordant and melodic, The Wink is an essential purchase for anyone who's followed Tim Presley's various recent projects (which also includes White Fence and Darker My Love), but with it's ample supply of quick fix wonky-rock it's also a good entry point for new recruits. And what a glimmering treasure trove of records there are waiting to be uncovered by those lucky people.

Listen to

"Morris" - if Jonathan Richman had embraced the synthesizer then it might have sounded a bit like this fractured and poetic little number.