New Routes out of Innerland

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new routes

New Routes out of Innerland is the new album from Mark Peters, the follow up (and re-imagining) of his critically acclaimed 2018 album Innerland. Eight remixes of the tracks from his debut solo album from a varity of collaborators including Ulrich Schnauss, Moon Gangs, Odd Nosdam, Jefre Cantu-Ledesma, Olga Wojciechowska, Andi Otto, E Ruscha V and Brian Case. Artists working together, across the globe on a collection called "New Routes out of Innerland" seems to be a nicely timed dig on our current political situation / brexit shambles. The original concept for Innerland was based around industrial North West England, but now the songs have been given their freedom, new leases of life, extensions and in many cases a complete re-invention. On "Mann Island (Olga Wojciechowska Rework), the gothic echoing guitar hook is replaced by something which sounds like it's being whistled by a POW in The Great Escape to chirpy/haunting effect. Brian Case adds adds a repetitive, industrial clout to an unrecognisable "Windy Arbour" (which was one of the more welcoming and accessible tracks from the original release). Similarly Odd Nodsam's remix of "Shaley Brow" is blunt and direct, removing all of the epic synthesizer highs and replacing them with something creepy, minimal and brilliantly strange. Regular collaborator Ulrich Schnauss (Schnauss and Peters released two albums together in 2012 & 2013) takes a gentler hand to the source material on "May Mill", actually removing some of the harder edges and adding some heavily doctored vocals into the mix. Moon Gangs keep the essence of "Gabriel's Ladder" too, but gradually and subtly change the game by offering up a more sweeping set of synth ambience and some marching drum effects that descend into a chaotic finale. The actual finale of the collection is Jefre Cantu-Ledesma's swelling, all-encompassing behemoth of a remix to "Ashurst's Beacon". The original of which was one of the few tracks on Innerland with a standard pop beat, but here it's been replaced by a disorientating rhythmic clatter and droning mix of guitar and synth. It perhaps sums up the varied and unpredictable nature of this collaboration (and most remix collections). Whilst the album might not have the flow and understated grace of the original Innerland, many of these remixes take the source material into wonderful, completely new and unexpected areas. A fine expansion of the Innerland universe.

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Mark Peters
Mark Peters
Sonic Cathedral